The Shining

The 1980 psychological horror film, based on Stephen King’s 1977 novel of the same name is directed by Stanley Kubrick stars Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Danny Lylod and Scatman Crothers. The Shining is widely considered to be among the best big-screen adaptations of a Stephen King story—and with good reason.

The film’s central character is Jack Torrance, who is an aspiring writer and recovering alcoholic who accepts the position of the off-season caretaker of the isolated Overlook Hotel in the Colorado Rockies. His wife Wendy Torrance and young son, Danny Torrance also joins Jack and decides to stay at the Overlook Hotel.

Danny, who has an imaginary friend named Tony, who speaks in a lower register of Danny’s voice. Before the family is left alone, in a brief conversation with the head chef Dick Hallorann, Hallorann warns Danny to stay away from Room 237,where the violence took place, and he tells Danny they share the “shining,” the psychic gift of reading minds and seeing the past and future. But, to this, Danny informs Hallorann that Tony doesn’t want him to discuss such things.

Tony is by all accounts Danny’s device for directing psychic input, including a stunning vision of blood spilling from around the shut hotel elevators. Danny additionally observes two young ladies wearing coordinating outfits; despite the fact that we know there was a two-year age distinction in the killed kids, the two young girls look inquisitively old. On the off chance that Danny is a dependable observer, he is observer to particular dreams of his own that may not compare to what is really occurring in the inn.

Danny who possesses “the shining”, psychic abilities that empower him to see into the lodging’s horrific past. The inn cook, Dick Hallorann, likewise has this capacity and can speak with Danny telepathically. The lodging had a past winter overseer who went crazy and murdered his family and himself. After a winter storm leaves the Torrance’s snowbound, Jack’s mental stability decays because of the impact of the powerful powers that possess the lodging, setting his significant other and child in harm’s way.

Kubrick masterfully develops so many horror tropes though – the lone, ghostly bartender, the eerie locked room, the creepy kid who should really just be in intensive therapy, foreboding flashbacks/flash forwards – and at least his lone black character lasts throughout the majority of the film, although he does of course die first.

Dark, disturbing, and ever questioning, Stanley Kubrick’s magnum opus, The Shining holds an exceptional spot in my heart as my favorite horror film. It has strongly affected me since the time I watched this film, from it’s truly quotable moments, exceptional scenes. The tale of the recuperating alcoholic Jack Torrance dealing with the Overlook Hotel for the winter. We learn of it’s upsetting past and the story gradually unfurls as Jack spirals into madness, before erupting into a violent murderous spree.

We never truly realize what occurs toward the end, only one scene that leaves the crowd addressing and has left them approaching those inquiries for a long time.

The Shining is alarming in a mental position. It doesn’t leap out you yet it screws with your head as though your going crazy with the characters. Everyone has their own speculations with regards to what ‘The Shining’ genuinely implies, yet there’s no genuine answer.But just as Kubrick himself said, “Real is good, Interesting is better”. Each time I watch I generally wind up getting goosebumps, from beginning to end.

This film, is one of the greatest Horror films of all the time. The thrilling sensation of acting, cinematography and music is outstanding.

By Rajrita Chattopadhyay

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